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What you Need to Know About Fish Oil & Omega 3s to Help With Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by on Sunday, January 26th, 2014

There is a lot of discussion today about how (and which) Omega-3s can have positive effects on the brain and promote cognitive health. Specifically, these have been touted as a way to slow the onset of memory loss, and reduce risk for dementia, including Alzheimer’s disease.  Does the truth live up to the hype?  If so, what type of fish oil is best, and are supplements enough to help with Alzheimer’s? 

From Confusion to Clarity

The #1 take home point with Omega’s 3s (also referred to as a “Omega 3 fatty acids”) is that not all of the different types are created equal in terms of potential for protecting brain health. As discussed in detail in The Alzheimer’s Diet book, there are several types of Omega-3s, with DHA having the most evidence for brain protection, followed by EPA. Another new study was recently published that again supports this. Another common form of Omega 3 is called ALA, but the problem with ALA is that only a very small percentage actually gets later converted in the body to the brain-boosting forms (DHA and EPA). Complicating things, a recent study showed an association between DHA and prostate cancer in men, yet the American Nutrition Association (as well as many experts) state that the overall benefits likely outweigh risk. Before considering any changes to ones diet or before considering starting a supplement, people should always discuss first and seek approval by their treating physician.  For a specialized opinion, scheduling a consultation with the Alzheimer’s Prevention & Treatment Program at New York Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center in NYC  is also an option.

Another important point that leads to a lot of confusion is that a lot of people use the terms “Fish Oil” and “Omega-3s” interchangeably. Fish oil comes from fish and can be supplemented in the diet in capsule form, but each capsule has different amounts of DHA, EPA, ALA etc. Many people also don’t realize that Omega 3 fatty acids are plentiful in certain types of fish, and the fish actually get these brain-healthy fatty acids from eating algae. There are even very specific types of Omega 3 supplements that are DIRECTLY from algae, rich in DHA, and have been studied specifically in patients with the earliest stages of AD.  These studies showed slowing of cognitive decline and improvements in memory. To learn more about this topic, as well as which types of fish may be most beneficial, and to read an overview of all the evidence and other specific dietary choices for Alzheimer’s prevention and treatment, read The Alzheimer’s Diet book.

Research

Research is being done regarding the effect of fish oil when it comes to the Alzheimer’s disease prevention and treatment.  Read below for more details.

Benefits of fish oil for help with Alzheimer's

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How Can I Reduce My Risk For Alzheimer’s? New Clinic Offers Help for AD Patients & Family at Risk

Posted by on Friday, January 10th, 2014

Alzheimer’s disease doesn’t just affect the patient; it affects the entire family. Recently, the Alzheimer’s Prevention & Treatment Program (APTP) and Alzheimer’s Prevention Clinic (APC) at New York-Presbyterian / Weill Cornell Medical Center was founded by Neurologist Dr. Richard Isaacson, an Alzheimer’s specialist who has several family members with this disease. This specialized clinic and research program focuses on the latest treatments for patients, as well as cutting-edge strategies that may reduce a person’s risk for AD (or help to delay its onset), with an emphasis on nutritional approaches and comprehensive education for the entire family. Interested in scheduling a consultation? Please call 212-746-0226

Scientists now understand that AD starts in the brain 20 to 30 years before the onset of symptoms, giving physicians ample time to intervene in an individualized fashion for those as risk. There is no “magic pill” or “magic cure” for AD treatment or prevention; however, combining a variety of strategies based on strong science and safety may yield the best chance for benefit.

As a part of this initiative, individuals interested in lowering their risk for Alzheimer’s can be followed over time and receive a personalized plan based on a variety of elements, such as their risk factors, genes, past/present medical conditions, and the latest scientific research. Patients in the APTP and APC will be cared for over time using a sophisticated and interactive state-of-the-art research tool and database. This approach allows for ongoing monitoring and the development of personalized therapeutic options aimed at reducing Alzheimer’s disease risk and providing optimal care.

The approach is based on a collaborative care model for Alzheimer’s disease, while being firmly grounded in the latest scientific evidence-based therapies. This integrated approach to care aims to provide the most comprehensive therapies for patients with Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer’s, “preclinical” Alzheimer’s, and patients who are at risk for the disease.

 Click Here to Visit the Alzheimer’s Prevention & Treatment Program

at Weill Cornell Medical College website:

 APTP 

Or, Visit this Page to Learn More about the Personalized Approach at the APTP.