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Is Popcorn Recommended as Part of a Healthy Alzheimer’s diet?

Posted by on Sunday, April 30th, 2017

healthy snacks for the Alzheimer's diet

 

The number of healthy, quick to prepare snacks available for a healthy Alzheimer’s diet is somewhat limited, particularly if you purchase processed packaged food to save time.  But one tried and true low calorie, high fiber, all natural food for the Alzheimer’s diet is popcorn.  But, it’s important to note that all popcorn is not created equal. 

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10 Reasons to Eat Legumes as Part of a Healthy Alzheimer’s Diet

Posted by on Tuesday, April 18th, 2017

Beans for the Alzheimer's diet

There is a pretty long list of foods that are recommended as part of a healthy Alzheimer’s diet.  From wild caught fish to berries and green leafy vegetables, brain healthy food choices are numerous.  But one food that doesn’t really get a lot of PR worthy of mentioning, is legumes (beans).  Legumes include any type of beans, lentils, soy nuts, peanuts (commonly categorized as nuts by mistake) and peas.  So, just why are legumes so healthy and why are they highly recommended as part of a heart and brain healthy diet? 

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Can Healthy Fat be Detrimental to the Alzheimer’s Diet?

Posted by on Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

 weight control for the Alzheimer's diet

These days, many food experts and nutritionists are raving about healthy fats such as avocados and olive oil as part of a brain healthy Alzheimer’s diet.  The era of the low- fat weight loss diet fad is considered obsolete today.  Recent research indicates that healthy unsaturated fat is necessary for overall heart and brain health, and serves as an important component in a successful weight loss program.  But where do we draw the line when it comes to fat?   Can too much healthy unsaturated fat be detrimental to an Alzheimer’s prevention diet?

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Drink to Your Health: 10 Reasons to Drink Tea for Alzheimer’s Prevention

Posted by on Monday, April 3rd, 2017

drinking tea for Alzheimer's prevention

Tea drinking rituals have been popular for thousands of years in eastern countries such as China and Japan.  Today tea drinking is gaining in popularity in the U.S. as well, but can drinking tea promote Alzheimer’s prevention?

Many people have started drinking tea due its health benefits.  Studies have shown that various types of tea promote heart and brain health, boost metabolism, provide antioxidants to stave off cancer and more.   In addition, recent scientific studies are beginning to reveal the possible benefits tea offers for improved cognition.

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10 Healthy and 5 Unhealthy Foods for the Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease

Posted by on Monday, March 20th, 2017

 Prevention of Alzheimer's disease

 

There are some interesting new diets surfacing lately that are making the claim to fame when it comes to prevention of Alzheimer’s disease.  It’s been said many times by nutritional experts, “what’s good for the heart is good for the brain.”  This may be the case with a new diet called the MIND diet.

What is the Mind Diet?  

The MIND diet is a hybrid diet combining foods from the Mediterranean and DASH diets for an eating guide that will promote heart health. MIND stands for Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay, and DASH stands for “Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension.

The Mind Diet and Alzhiemer’s Disease Prevention  

Recently the MIND diet was found in clinical studies to promote brain health.  The study, performed at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, revealed that the MIND diet may reduce risks of Alzheimer’s disease by as much as 53%.

The MIND diet is thought to be a simpler version of the Mediterranean diet because it is comprised of a list of “10 brain healthy food groups” and 5 “unhealthy food groups” to limit or avoid.  Read on to view the list of these healthy and unhealthy foods that comprise the MIND diet.

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A New Alzheimer’s Diet to Keep in MIND

Posted by on Sunday, March 12th, 2017

 brain healthy foods for the Alzheimer's diet

A new Alzheimer’s diet called the MIND (Mediterranean-DASH Intervention for Neurodegenerative Delay) diet may help to lower risks of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by as much as 53%.

A recent Rush University Medical Center study funded by the National Institute on Aging aimed to discover if the MIND diet effected the risk of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD).  Martha Clare Morris, PhD, and colleagues developed the MIND diet which integrates foods from the Mediterranean diet and the DASH (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diets. 

The MIND diet is considered a combination of the Mediterranean and DASH diets, both of which have been shown in studies to lower the risk of high blood pressure, heart attack and stroke.  Some studies have found that the two diets may also help protect against Alzheimer’s dementia. 

The MIND diet was developed after compiling years of past research results about the therapeutic and adverse effects of various foods on brain health.   

For years, scientists have known that diet can have a big impact on heart health and now the evidence is stacking up that an increase of some foods and restriction of others can contribute to brain health.

The MIND Diet Study

The study of 900 people ages 58 to 98 participated in neurological testing and answered questionnaires about daily food consumption.  Those study group members who followed the MIND diet recommendations closely were found to test higher in cognitive functioning tests.  In fact, they exhibited the range of cognitive functioning of a person 7 and a half years younger.

The study results, published in the journal Alzheimer’s and Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association, revealed that AD risks were lowered by 53% in those who “adhered rigorously” to the diet and by 35% in the participants who followed the diet “moderately.”

One of the most exciting outcomes of the study was the fact that even those who only moderately followed the diet reduced their risk of AD by a third.   

Nutritional epidemiologist, Martha Clare Morris, PHD, the lead author of the MIND diet study, said “Diet appears to be just one of many factors that play into who gets the disease.” “Genetics and other factors like smoking, exercise and education also play a role, but the MIND diet helped slow the rate of cognitive decline and protect against Alzheimer’s regardless of other risk factors” said Morris.

Morris went on to explain the MIND diet is an easier diet to follow than the Mediterranean diet, which is comprised of a daily diet of several servings for fruits and vegetables as well as fish.  In comparison, the MIND diet simply lists 10 brain healthy foods and 5 foods to avoid, see Part 2 of the MIND diet for details on the specific foods on each list. 

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Could a New Vaccine be the Key to Alzheimer’s Prevention

Posted by on Sunday, February 26th, 2017

Research for Alzheimer's Prevention

Scientists have been searching for decades to find clues to unlocking the mystery surrounding Alzheimer’s prevention and treatment.  Is it possible that the key to finding a cure for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is an Alzheimer’s prevention vaccine?  

One study conducted by James Nicoll, professor of neuropathology at Southampton University, in the U.K., concluded that a vaccine might be able to initiate the immune system into removing amyloid beta protein (also called plaques) in the brain.  Amyloid is an abnormal sticky protein substance that typically accumulates in the brain as a symptom of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).  These plaques interfere with normal transmission of nerve cells in the brain, and serve as a  primary cause of memory loss in AD. 

Nicoll commented that while the vaccine stopped the production of amyloid in the brain (during the study), he was amazed to discover that the symptoms of cognitive decline,  and eventually the rate of early death, was NOT slowed down by the vaccine.

Alzheimer’s Prevention Theory

One theory resulting from Nicoll’s research is the possibility that if people could be given the vaccine before symptoms of AD became severe (no later than age 50), the devastating effects of Alzheimer’s could possibly be prevented.   

Alzheimer’s Prevention and Mouse Studies

Based on successful results from immunization in mouse AD models (in past clinical studies), more recent studies were implemented using active and passive immunizations.  But active immunization in humans resulted in an autoimmune inflammatory response, so those trials were stopped.   

Passive immunity, however has showed much more promise in slowing down the Alzheimer’s disease process in clinical studies. More recently, a study published in 2017 by PubMed.gov (The U.S. National Library of Medicine) from the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease, looked at aged rabbits to observe the effect of a DNA Vaccine.

These immunizations were administered to rabbits using a gene gun (a biolistic particle delivery system) into the skin and the results were, absence of  inflammatory immune response.  Although positive effects on pathology of AD in the brain were seen in rabbit studies, these benefits have not yet been observed in humans.  However, based on the results of the test on rodents, some studies indicate immunization has a high likeliness of being safe and effective in future clinical Alzheimer’s prevention trials on humans.  

Alzheimer’s Prevention and the Immune System

In an article published by the journal of Science Translated Medicine, the function of plaques in the disease process is not clear. Rudolph Tanzi of Harvard Medical School asked the question, “does it play a role in the brain, or is it just garbage that accumulates?”  But recently Tanzi has shown that these plaques may be a defense against invading pathogens.  Tanzi’s research team at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston, found that beta-amyloid may comprise part of the immune system, acting as an anti-microbial compound.  This theory certainly makes sense considering the positive results that previous studies have realized when it comes the impact of the vaccine on beta-amyloid.

To test the relationship between AD and the immune system the research team injected bacteria into the brains of mice AD models. The study indicated that plaques formed overnight.   “When you look in the plaques, each one had a single bacterium in it,” says Tanzi. “A single bacterium can induce an entire plaque overnight.”

Study Conclusions

The study concluded that there is a possibility that infections in the brain could trigger amyloid-beta plaque formation, as the sticky substance attempts to kill bacteria and other pathogens.  Then if amyloid does not get removed by the body quickly enough, the result may be tau tangles (another abnormal protein in the brain, common in AD) which leads to death to the nerve cells,  and ultimately comprises symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease. 

The good news is that if AD, in fact, stems from pathogens in the brain, a vaccine may be possible in the future. 

Learn more about Alzheimer’s disease in the ground-breaking book written by Dr. Richard Isaacson, Harvard trained neurologist.  The book is called The Alzheimer’s Treatment and  Prevention Diet, you can CLICK HERE to read more about it.  

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Home Cooked Meals: A Primary Ingredient for The Alzheimer’s Diet

Posted by on Friday, February 17th, 2017

home cooking for the Alzheimer's diet

 

If you or a loved are attempting to adhere to the Alzheimer’s diet, you may be interested to learn about a recent study on home cooked meals.  The study, published by John Hopkins School of Public Health, (online in the journal Public Health Nutrition) says people who cook at home, may be getting many health benefits compared to those who eat out.  In fact, the study found those who make more home cooked meals are consuming less calories than others who don’t cook as often.  Find out about the conclusions of this study  and  how home cooking can enhance and support the Alzheimer’s diet.

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The Facts About Fiber for the Alzheimer’s Diet

Posted by on Thursday, February 9th, 2017

fiber for the Alzheimer's diet

Fiber is a vital nutrient for disease prevention and overall health, it also carries a lot of weight when considering some of the best  foods for the Alzheimer’s diet.

In today’s hectic world of rushing from place to place, it can be a real challenge to get enough fiber intake  each day.  You may be surprised to learn that the recommended daily intake of fiber is around 25 to 30 grams.  The fiber should be from a variety of food sources (not from supplements).  This recommendation comes from the American Heart Association.  Most Americans get only about half that amount each day.  So, what’s so great about fiber, and how can you ensure you are getting the right amount for a healthy Alzheimer’s diet?  

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The Link Between Alzheimer’s Prevention and Type II Diabetes

Posted by on Sunday, February 5th, 2017

 diabetes and lzheimer's prevention

Research studies indicate there may be  a close relationship between several disease entities and Alzheimer’s disease, in fact, Alzheimer’s prevention measures should encompass prevention strategies of other disorders including, cancer, heart disease, obesity, and particularly Type 2 diabetes (referred to as T2B in the research arena).  The incidence of T2B has risen so dramatically in recent years that it’s become known as a new global epidemic. Learning about the risks for diabetes is part of an effective Alzheimer’s prevention/education strategy. But what does diabetes have to do with Alzheimer’s prevention?

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